Celebrating the Autumn Equinox with Kimchi

City dwellers and farmers alike are welcoming the end of summer and the start of all that comes with autumn—the equinox is upon us, at last! While harvesting the bounty of our latest season at Ujima, Slow Food NYC’s community farm resource in Brooklyn, we found ourselves with an abundance of cabbage. Of course, we knew we’d put our plenty to good use with nothing going to waste.

What is one to do? Enter: kimchi, a fermented classic hailing from Korean cuisine. With wheelbarrows of freshly plucked cabbages waiting for their moment, we asked our urban farmer Jonathan Blumberg for his method that celebrates preservation and traditions of the table.

 Photo Credit: Alexander Craig

Photo Credit: Alexander Craig

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See below for Jonathan’s go-to recipe that our visiting students have been enjoying. Share your own creation on Instagram and don’t forget to tag us for a chance to be featured.

Autumn Equinox Kimchi

Ingredients

1 local cabbage, cut into 2-inch strips (try a nearby farmer’s market)

1/4-1/2 cup kosher salt

2 tablespoons garlic, minced

2 tablespoons ginger, minced

1 teaspoon sugar

1/4 cup of fish sauce (we like using Red Boat)

3 tablespoons water

4 tablespoons red pepper flakes

1 large daikon radish, peeled and cut into 1-inch matchsticks

2 bunches green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces

Preparation

1.   Place cabbage in a large bowl and sprinkle with salt. Mix thoroughly using gloves, if preferred. Place a heavy pot or pan on top with weights and allow cabbage to sit for 1-2 hours until wilted and water has been released.

2.   Discard water after 1-2 hours. Rinse the cabbage 2-3 times in the sink until salt is removed and allow to drain in a colander for another 15-20 minutes.

3.   Combine cabbage with remaining ingredients (through water) and mix. Using gloves, add the red pepper flakes and begin mixing and rubbing flakes into the mixture.

4.   Once combined, place mixture in a jar pressing down and packing tightly so that the mixture is submerged in its own liquid. Place top on jar and allow to sit at room temperature for 2-5 days. Place jar on a plate since the mixture may bubble over while fermenting.

5.   Each day of fermentation, remove the lid to release gases and press down on the mixture to keep it submerged. You can taste a sample each day to decide if the level of fermentation is to your liking.

6.   After 2-5 days of fermentation, store kimchi in refrigerator.

7.   Enjoy! We eat our kimchi straight out of the jar and incorporated into meals for a healthy dose of gut-healthy probiotics.

Recipe adapted from this original source.

 Photo Credit: Alexander Craig

Photo Credit: Alexander Craig

Keen to learn more about our educational initiatives across New York City? Click here for more information about our Urban Harvest program or subscribe to our newsletter. Follow along on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter to stay updated on slow happenings near you!

Words by Alexander Craig, Slow Food NYC Board Member

Join the Campaign for Good Food Education

Dear Slow Food NYC Supporters,

Here at Slow Food NYC, we offer a variety of programs to allow people to experience what we mean by Good, Clean, and Fair Food for All. Through Slow U we offer annual and other special fun and educational events, like Duck Off! An all local duck cook-off, and the SFNYC Food Almanac, our annual food and farm policy review. Snail of Approval provides a chance for restauranteurs, food and beverage artisans, markets, and caterers   to also get involved and align their values with Slow Food's. 

Ultimately, all of the time and energy put into these events goes to fuel Urban Harvest, including our program of  hands-on experience at our educational urban farm that provides young people in East New York a bit of time getting their hands dirty and learning about the joy of food directly from farm to plate. Our tuition free program operates through the summer months, allowing students to participate in summer programs and taste the bounty of food grown in their very own neighborhood. 

 Photo Credit: Alexander Craig

Photo Credit: Alexander Craig

Ujima is at the very heart of SFNYC, but it takes many hands and quite a bit of time and money to prep the land and programming for excited young students in the summer. With the help of our farmers and an education and outreach team, we'll be starting our 8th year of good food education at Ujima this summer. We hope to continue this program many years into the future, but we can't do it without the support of all of you. In order to continue the work that we've done through Urban Harvest, we ask that you donate any dollar amount to our Good Food Education in East New York campaign.

Please click the link to find out more about our program at Ujima and check out the video to see just how impactful the farm is to the students that take part. Thank you for your generosity and dedication to the cause. ‎

Slowly, 

Slow Food NYC

Slow Food NYC Recruiting New Board Members for 2017

Slow Food NYC is looking for a few great men and women! We're wrapping up another great year and are now seeking passionate, talented, energetic Slow Food supporters who will join our Board to serve a three-year term and help us continue our work toward a good, clean and fair food system in New York City.

Eligible nominees must be current members of Slow Food USA. If you are interested in running for a board slot, nominations are due by 6:00 pm on Sunday, December 4. You may make multiple nominations, and you may self-nominate. In each case, please provide a few sentences in support of the candidate's qualifications.

Submit nominations here: https://slowfoodnyc.wufoo.com/forms/slow-food-nyc-2017-board-elections/

Our Elections Committee will review your nominations and select a slate of nominees. Voting by the current membership is scheduled to take place in early January 2017. If you have any questions, please contact the Elections Committee at info@slowfoodnyc.org.

 Photo Credit: Alexander Craig

Photo Credit: Alexander Craig