Brooklyn

Watty & Meg

Sosie Hublitz founded Watty and Meg in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn to be a neighborhood restaurant, and that's just what it's become, drawing a crowd of regulars, some of them three or four times a week. The kitchen combines French technique with local, seasonal ingredients—chef John Glowaki, a Charlie Palmer alum, lives near the Union Square Greenmarket, where he sources much of the restaurant's local produce, cage-free poultry, grass-fed beef and wild fish.

Tini Wine Bar Café

This is a neighborhood joint that serves food fresh from the local community with love and care. The recent addition of Red Hook eggs (whose deep orange yolks urban chicken farmer Declan Walsh bragged about—rightly—at a recent Slow U seminar) makes their weekend brunches even more of a draw. They source their ingredients very locally using Added Value Farm in Red Hook for their seasonal produce. And, they serve beer from Dogfish Head and cider from Warwick Valley, NY.

 

(718) 855 - 4206

414 Van Brunt Street Brooklyn, NY 11231

Brooklyn 

Stinky Bklyn

Stinky Bklyn is a purveyor of cheeses, cured meats, and an eclectic assortment of packaged food products. They offer quite a few farmstead and artisanal cheeses from the Bronson Hill Creamery, Sprout Creek Farm, Northland Sheep Dairy, and other local producers. Milk and other dairy products are from Evans Farm House Dairy. Salvatore, a well-known Brooklyn processor, supplies ricotta, and yogurt is from an Icelandic recipe made in Queens by Siggis.

Seersucker

Seersucker is splitting the difference deliciously between local and southern. Chef Robert Newton is sourcing from upstate farmers, the Carroll Gardens farmers' market across the street, and local producers like Blue Marble Ice Cream, Red Hook Winery and Sixpoint Craft Ales, but his cuisine is inspired by the American South—Stoneground Grits Spoonbread, Crispy Pig's Foot, Fried Bologna Sandwich, Pork Belly and Collard Greens, scratch biscuits.

Rose Water

Open since 2000, Rose Water was "slow" long before it was in, and long before Park Slope became a foodie destination.

Meat Hook, The

The Meat Hook, snuggled in at the back of The Brooklyn Kitchen in Williamsburg, offers responsible carnivores meat from regionally, humanely and sustainably raised livestock. It's easy to spot The Brooklyn Kitchen as you walk along Frost St—a life-sized statue of a steer stands outside the front door.

Marlow and Sons

Marlow and Sons started as a kind of Diner adjunct, a place next door where overflow could wait at the bar behind a high-quality bodega for takeout sandwiches, coffee, tea, fair-trade chocolate and Fizzy Lizzy. But one thing led to another, and Marlow and Sons is now the neighborhood osteria to Diner's bistro, featuring east coast oysters renowned for their freshness, local salumi and farmstead cheeses, market-based soups, salads, panini and pastas, entrees based on sustainably raised meats from Chef Sean Rembold's whole animal program, and an exceptionally well priced wine list.

Marlow and Daughters

It was the whole animal program at Diner and Marlow and Sons that led to the latest addition to the family, Marlow and Daughters, an old-fashioned neighborhood butcher shop in the historic former barbershop just up the block. Caroline and head butcher Tom Mylan buy whole animals from sustainable regional farms like Flying Pigs Farm, 3-Corner Field Farm and Slope Farm, from which they supply the restaurants and produce notable charcuterie, including paté, duck leg confit, several kinds of rillettes and fresh sausages.

Lunetta

Lunetta is the very model of a Slow Food NYC Snail of Approval restaurant. The menu changes with the seasons, but a recent winter version included house-cured pancetta, soppressatta and finocchiona, local rapini, brussel sprouts, kale and cauliflower, and the now famous Lunetta meatballs made from sustainably-raised Berkshire pork and grass-fed beef.

James

James calls itself "a seasonal American restaurant with Old-World European influences," and it is something of an Old World dream come true in Brooklyn for Bryan Calvert (once personal chef to Susan Sontag and Annie Liebovitz) and his wife Deborah Williamson – he runs the kitchen, she the dining room, and they live in the apartment upstairs. Mr. Calvert being a Bouley alumnus, those influences lean toward the French – purées, reductions, confits, beurre blancs – but the produce leans toward the local, including fresh herbs from the couple's own garden.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Brooklyn