Manhattan

Rye House

Rye House is a tavern specializing in spirits, wine and beer made in the USA. Cocktails are created with rum from Louisiana, vodka from Idaho, white whiskey from Iowa, gin from Oregon, bourbon from Kentucky (as it should be), applejack from Jersey, and rye made right on the premises. Lynnette Marrero and Jim Kearns, on the bar, learned their mixology from Julie Reiner (Snail-approved Flat Iron Lounge) and Audrey Saunders (Snail-approved Pegu Club) so you can be sure there'll be sure hands on the cocktail shaker.

Rouge Tomate

Rouge Tomate, a massive bi-level urban retreat fashioned of glass, foliage, eco-friendly fabrics and FSC-certified woods, is the Madison Avenue branch of a high-concept Belgian resto committed to a sophisticated cuisine that is also socially and environmentally responsible.

Momofuku

Momofuku is Japanese for "lucky peach"; it is American for a strange and wonderful little restaurant empire in the East Village. David Chang is a chef without borders – his highly technical cuisine, by turns Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Southeast Asian, and New American, is always market-driven, and mines the dark underbelly of the local bounty.

Mas (farmhouse)

Galen Zamarra, chef/co-owner of Mas (farmhouse) and Slow Food NYC member, is an exemplary proponent of regional and sustainable eating. In a September 2006 interview with StarChefs.com Galen said, "I'd love to do more projects with Slow Food. And I'm really interested in sustainability, getting restaurants back to nature, and supporting local farmers." Galen is as good as his word (and his words are as good as his food). He is a great supporter of Slow Food NYC, having arranged food for several major events.

Lupa

Another branch of Mario Batali's Italian restaurant empire, Lupa specifically celebrates the trattoria-style dishes of Rome. Sous-chef Alexis Pisciotta is particularly proud of their handcut pastas, made daily, and house-cured salumi, which is done using traditional methods. They bring in whole animals and utilize everything—whole cuts for curing, a rack for a special, the balance for sausage or ragu. Their everyday pork is from Heritage Foods USA, the chickens are organic, and they buy locally and sustainably as often as possible.

Lucy's Whey

Lucy's Whey sells American Artisanal cheeses. They all made by hand, and all present "a distinctive flavor profile that reflects the animals, the region, and the ingenuity of the cheesemakers." The staff is passionate and knowledgeable, not only about the cheeses but about the intrinsic relationship between taste, terroir and healthy communities that is at the heart of Slow Food's ethic of food that is good, clean and fair. Full disclosure: One of those people is Chelsea Market store manager Amy Thompson, longtime member of the SFNYC leadership and our resident cheese expert.

Jimmy's No. 43

Jimmy Carbone is "Italian on both sides." His amiable, eponymous dive bar*, well below the East 7th Street grade, is a place where, alone or in good company, one can hide comfortably from the world above. There are a dozen beers on draught and as many by the neck, including a number of regionally produced brews, and the menu includes local, farmstead cheeses supplied by local cheesemongers, and all-local pickles from Rick's Picks.

Il Buco

Chef Ignacio Mattos grew up in his Italian grandmother's kitchen on the family farm, and those origins flavor a menu that celebrates both authentic Italian cuisine and local agriculture—Anson Mills polenta and Chatham cod share space with Umbrian chickpeas and Trapanese sea salt, and a wonderful array of house-made salumi, from coppa to lardo. The dining room, often mistaken for an antique shop, is all rustic warmth and conviviality, and the wine cellar is available for private events.

Hundred Acres

Hundred Acres is named for "Hell's Hundred Acres," the gritty, pre-1970 moniker for SoHo. It is the sibling of Marc Meyer's Snail of Approval-winning restaurants Five Points and Cookshop and occupies the old space of Provence, the late French resto air-kissed adieu by a clientele of models and their adorers. Hundred Acres is a far slower place. On entering, guests encounter a wooden table invitingly laden with fresh, local produce...an enticing prelude to the coming meal.

Hot Bread Kitchen

 

Hot Bread Kitchen increases economic security for foreign-born and low-income women and men by opening access to the billion dollar specialty food industry. We do this through our culinary workforce and business incubation programs, Project Launch and HBK Incubates.

 

To help offset the cost of our training and to build esteem in the contribution of immigrants, we sell delicious multi-ethnic breads that are inspired by our bakers and the many countries that they come from.  We make it a priority to use local and organic ingredients.

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