Manhattan

Jimmy's No. 43

Jimmy Carbone is "Italian on both sides." His amiable, eponymous dive bar*, well below the East 7th Street grade, is a place where, alone or in good company, one can hide comfortably from the world above. There are a dozen beers on draught and as many by the neck, including a number of regionally produced brews, and the menu includes local, farmstead cheeses supplied by local cheesemongers, and all-local pickles from Rick's Picks.

Il Buco

Chef Ignacio Mattos grew up in his Italian grandmother's kitchen on the family farm, and those origins flavor a menu that celebrates both authentic Italian cuisine and local agriculture—Anson Mills polenta and Chatham cod share space with Umbrian chickpeas and Trapanese sea salt, and a wonderful array of house-made salumi, from coppa to lardo. The dining room, often mistaken for an antique shop, is all rustic warmth and conviviality, and the wine cellar is available for private events.

Hundred Acres

Hundred Acres is named for "Hell's Hundred Acres," the gritty, pre-1970 moniker for SoHo. It is the sibling of Marc Meyer's Snail of Approval-winning restaurants Five Points and Cookshop and occupies the old space of Provence, the late French resto air-kissed adieu by a clientele of models and their adorers. Hundred Acres is a far slower place. On entering, guests encounter a wooden table invitingly laden with fresh, local produce...an enticing prelude to the coming meal.

Hot Bread Kitchen

 

Hot Bread Kitchen increases economic security for foreign-born and low-income women and men by opening access to the billion dollar specialty food industry. We do this through our culinary workforce and business incubation programs, Project Launch and HBK Incubates.

 

To help offset the cost of our training and to build esteem in the contribution of immigrants, we sell delicious multi-ethnic breads that are inspired by our bakers and the many countries that they come from.  We make it a priority to use local and organic ingredients.

Home

With a name like “Home,” one expects a certain experience—comfy environs, simple rustic dishes, unpretentious delivery: It works. Expect to find beautiful but simply presented... well, “homey” dishes, like (you wish) your mom used to make: crusty macaroni and cheese, aromatic trout fillets, lush bacon-topped salads, classic sandwiches, succulent roasted game, spiced pork chops... all cooked with care and mainly sourced from sustainable local producers.

New Amsterdam Market

New Amsterdam Market is a reinvention of the Public Market, once a prevalent institution in the City of New York. New Amsterdam Market is currently held in the parking lot fronting the Fulton Fish Market at the South Street Seaport, a district in which public markets have been held since 1642. Revived for our present times and needs, New Amsterdam Market provides an outlet for for small, local butchers, grocers, mongers, and other vendors who source, produce, distribute, and sell foods made with regional ingredients.

Pegu Club

Audrey Saunders, co-owner of Pegu Club and one of New York’s premier mixologists, is a protégé of Dale DeGroff, the storied, former bartender at the art deco Rainbow Grill. The elegant, one-flight-up Pegu Club is decorated to evoke the feeling of its 19th-century Burma predecessor, famous for its eponymous cocktail. Audrey provides her nonpareil bartenders with inspiration and the stuff of great cocktails, the best ingredients, including the perfect, and occasionally rare, spirits, freshly squeezed juices, and house-made ingredients like her spicy ginger beer.

Pearl Oyster Bar

Rebecca Charles, owner and chef, has personally rescued an American regional cuisine—that of coastal New England—elevated it to heavenly status, and made of it a nationwide movement. While her exceptional lobster roll has garnered all the press, it is far from the only charm on Pearl’s menu: pristinely fried oysters and clams, each nestled on its own cushion of crunchy, creamy tartar sauce; chowder to die for; crab cakes that are all crab; and oh, that pan-fried fish sandwich and those shoestring fries!

O Ottomanelli & Sons Prime Meat Market

Ottomanelli’s is a classic, one of the last of its kind. When they opened eighty or so years ago there was a neighborhood butcher in every neighborhood in America — now it’s a rarity in New York, an anomaly in most places. Ottomanelli’s was one of the first butchers to source free‐range poultry and pasture‐raised meats, but the real contribution they make is their practice and maintenance of what has become a severely endangered set of skills, of artistry really, that bridges the wide gap between the animal in the field and the food in the pan.

New Leaf Restaurant and Bar

New Leaf, in Fort Tryon Park just north of the George Washington Bridge, is an enterprise of Bette Midler’s New York Restoration Project. Proceeds support NYRP’s mission of reclaiming New York City’s green spaces, so every dollar spent there does double duty for sustainability – it pays for all the fresh, seasonal ingredients chef Scott Campbell sources from Greenmarkets, local farms and community gardens, and it’s ploughed, so to speak, back into the mission of greening the city.

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