Restaurant

Marlow and Daughters

It was the whole animal program at Diner and Marlow and Sons that led to the latest addition to the family, Marlow and Daughters, an old-fashioned neighborhood butcher shop in the historic former barbershop just up the block. Caroline and head butcher Tom Mylan buy whole animals from sustainable regional farms like Flying Pigs Farm, 3-Corner Field Farm and Slope Farm, from which they supply the restaurants and produce notable charcuterie, including paté, duck leg confit, several kinds of rillettes and fresh sausages.

Lupa

Another branch of Mario Batali's Italian restaurant empire, Lupa specifically celebrates the trattoria-style dishes of Rome. Sous-chef Alexis Pisciotta is particularly proud of their handcut pastas, made daily, and house-cured salumi, which is done using traditional methods. They bring in whole animals and utilize everything—whole cuts for curing, a rack for a special, the balance for sausage or ragu. Their everyday pork is from Heritage Foods USA, the chickens are organic, and they buy locally and sustainably as often as possible.

Lunetta

Lunetta is the very model of a Slow Food NYC Snail of Approval restaurant. The menu changes with the seasons, but a recent winter version included house-cured pancetta, soppressatta and finocchiona, local rapini, brussel sprouts, kale and cauliflower, and the now famous Lunetta meatballs made from sustainably-raised Berkshire pork and grass-fed beef.

Jimmy's No. 43

Jimmy Carbone is "Italian on both sides." His amiable, eponymous dive bar*, well below the East 7th Street grade, is a place where, alone or in good company, one can hide comfortably from the world above. There are a dozen beers on draught and as many by the neck, including a number of regionally produced brews, and the menu includes local, farmstead cheeses supplied by local cheesemongers, and all-local pickles from Rick's Picks.

James

James calls itself "a seasonal American restaurant with Old-World European influences," and it is something of an Old World dream come true in Brooklyn for Bryan Calvert (once personal chef to Susan Sontag and Annie Liebovitz) and his wife Deborah Williamson – he runs the kitchen, she the dining room, and they live in the apartment upstairs. Mr. Calvert being a Bouley alumnus, those influences lean toward the French – purées, reductions, confits, beurre blancs – but the produce leans toward the local, including fresh herbs from the couple's own garden.

Il Buco

Chef Ignacio Mattos grew up in his Italian grandmother's kitchen on the family farm, and those origins flavor a menu that celebrates both authentic Italian cuisine and local agriculture—Anson Mills polenta and Chatham cod share space with Umbrian chickpeas and Trapanese sea salt, and a wonderful array of house-made salumi, from coppa to lardo. The dining room, often mistaken for an antique shop, is all rustic warmth and conviviality, and the wine cellar is available for private events.

iCi

"98% of our ingredients are local, and as much as possible, we source our produce from right here in Brooklyn," says Laurent Saillard. Ici, owned by Saillard and his wife Catherine, has taken local to a whole new level by buying their produce from the Red Hook Farm. The menu is seasonal—updated versions of the classics that often have an unusual and tasty spin. My favorites are the skate with garlicky collard greens and the pumpkin "pizza" with goat cheese and prosciutto. The wine list is small but exciting with wines from small growers who work their vines in a traditional manner.

Hundred Acres

Hundred Acres is named for "Hell's Hundred Acres," the gritty, pre-1970 moniker for SoHo. It is the sibling of Marc Meyer's Snail of Approval-winning restaurants Five Points and Cookshop and occupies the old space of Provence, the late French resto air-kissed adieu by a clientele of models and their adorers. Hundred Acres is a far slower place. On entering, guests encounter a wooden table invitingly laden with fresh, local produce...an enticing prelude to the coming meal.

Home

With a name like “Home,” one expects a certain experience—comfy environs, simple rustic dishes, unpretentious delivery: It works. Expect to find beautiful but simply presented... well, “homey” dishes, like (you wish) your mom used to make: crusty macaroni and cheese, aromatic trout fillets, lush bacon-topped salads, classic sandwiches, succulent roasted game, spiced pork chops... all cooked with care and mainly sourced from sustainable local producers.

Colonie

Colonie is located on a tree-lined block of Atlantic Avenue, two blocks from the East River, perched on the edge of Brooklyn Heights. Colonie adds an affordable, approachable and delicious culinary option to Brooklyn Heights' beautiful streetscapes and incredible city views.

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